Academic CME/CPD in the United States and Canada: The 2015 AAMC/SACME Harrison Survey

Academic CME/CPD in the United States and Canada: The 2015 AAMC/SACME Harrison Survey

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The biennial Harrison Survey highlights the evolution of continuing medical education/continuing professional development (CME/CPD) functions within academic medical centers (AMCs) from isolated and passive to integrated, innovative, and impactful offices dedicated to patient care, research, and education.
 
An update to the 2013 report, the 2015 Harrison survey report provides an information toolkit for AMC leaders to identify and understand the placement and alignment of their own CME/CPD unit based on responses from 155 U.S. and Canadian CME/CPD offices. Key insights include:
  • Over half (53%) believe that the CME/CPD unit’s role is moderately or highly valued by their organization.
  • Almost 90% of academic CME/CPD units have a relatively high degree of interaction with residency education, faculty development, and allied health professional programs.
  • Over two-thirds of CME/CPD programs are involved in faculty development activities to improve faculty teaching, with 92% percent of respondents indicating a positive impact on resident teaching.
  • Less than half of the academic CME/CPD units (46%) have access to and employ quality improvement/patient safety data to drive CME/CPD programming and interventions, a nine-percent decrease from 2013, requiring them to rely on the more general objective data readily available.
  • Only four-percent include patients in CME/CPD planning and activities regularly, often, or always; the vast majority (96%) have absent or minimal patient participation, presenting opportunities to improve the inclusion of patients as planners and partners.
  • Institutional support for academic CME/CPD units has increased slightly, and those reporting an increase in the year-to-year dollar amount from this support perceive a rise of 8% over the amount reported in the 2013 survey.
  • Funding for CME/CPD-focused research is twice as likely to be provided internally (by the unit or institution) than by any single external funding source (commercial interests, grants, or other sources), demonstrating collaboration both within and across AMCs.
For a high-level view of the results, download the 2015 AAMC/SACME Harrison Survey Executive Summary.
 
This seventh biennial Harrison Survey was jointly sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education (SACME), in collaboration with the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada (AFMC).