Physician Specialty Data Report (2016)

Physician Specialty Data Report (2016)

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Available for immediate viewing, the 2016 Physician Specialty Data Report provides comprehensive statistics about active physicians and physicians in training in the largest specialty groups. The 2016 edition, updated from the 2014 edition, provides current data about the physician workforce across specialties in a series of figures and tables.
 
The 2016 Physician Specialty Data Report is divided into two categories:
  • Active physicians 
  • Residents and fellows
For each section, the report provides data on active physicians or residents and fellows who are in the 43 largest specialty groups. Data include the numbers by specialty group; the number of people per active physician or residents and fellows by specialty group; age, sex, and type of medical degree by specialty group; and percentage change in the numbers by specialty group (2010–2015).

Representative findings for active physicians include:

  • The specialty with the largest number of active physicians was the primary care specialty of internal medicine (114,089). (See Table 1.1.) 
  • Percentages of females in the top specialties ranged from a high of 61.9 percent in pediatrics to a low of 5.0 percent in orthopedic surgery. (See Table 1.3.) 
  • In 2015, 43.2 percent of active physicians in the United States were age 55 or older. The report includes a breakout of such physicians by specialty. (See Table 1.4.) 
  • The five-year period from 2010 to 2015 saw remarkable growth in some specialties, particularly interventional cardiology, which grew 69.3 percent, from 1,923 to 3,255. Other specialties decreased in number, including anatomic/clinical pathology (–11.3 percent). (See Table 1.9.)
Representative findings for residents and fellows include:
  • The specialty with the largest number of first-year ACGME residents and fellows was the primary care specialty of internal medicine (9,076). (See Table 2.1.)  
  • Percentages of females in the largest specialties ranged from a high of 83.1 percent in obstetrics and gynecology residencies to a low of 8.4 percent in interventional cardiology residencies. (See Table 2.2.)
  • Between 2010 and 2015, vascular and interventional radiology (27.3 percent) saw the most growth in the number of first-year ACGME residents and fellows. Geriatric medicine (–21.1 percent) saw the biggest decrease. (See Table 2.6.)
Primary data sources include: The American Medical Association 2016 Physician Masterfile (data as of December 31, 2015) provided data on physicians, the U.S. Census Bureau provided population estimates and GME Track, a resident database and tracking system, provided data on residents and fellows.

This publication was updated on 11/2016.